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Interim Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan

Southern Sydney Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee 1999

Plan Cover Page

TCM

Vision

Mission

Contents

Foreword

1. Introduction

In recent years, the community has become very much more aware of, and vocal about the urgent need to do something to ensure that our society becomes sustainable and our environment is managed, restored and protected for our future generations. That we must take action to repair the damage that has been done and stop the continuing damage. There is also a greater realisation that we must all take individual responsibility and participate in the process of natural resource and environmental management (NREM) by ensuring that our activities and lifestyles are sustainable. In particular, there is a greater awareness that effective NREM requires a commitment at an individual and local level, in partnership with Governments at all levels, Local, State and Federal.

2. Development of the Regional Strategic Plan

3. Key Regional Priority Issues

4. NHT Applications

5 References & Bibliography

Appendices

Illustrations

Notes:

Catchment Management
On 8 December 1999 the NSW Minister for Land and Water Conservation, Richard Amery, announced that 18 Catchment Management Boards would replace 43 of the 45 Catchment Management Committees and the Five Regional Catchment Committees. As part of this process the Southern Sydney Catchment Management Board was formed after this report was printed. The Southern Sydney Catchment Management Board now has management responsibility for Catchment Management in Southern Sydney.
Natural Heritage Trust applications for 2001-02 were invited for projects that addressed the priority natural resource and environmental management issues and outcomes for the Southern Sydney Catchment Management Board area. These priority issues were drawn from this Interim Strategic Plan produced by the Southern Sydney Regional Catchments Coordinating Committee (Bryan Hall).

Publication Details
Published Electronically on au.riversinfo.org by the Environmental Information Association (Incorporated). The Natural Heritage Trust provided project funds which were used to assist in publishing this material. The SSRSP is offered without copyright for all original material herein, provided that the source (the SSRCC) is acknowledged. In the case of variation between this document and the hard copy original the original takes precedence. (Bryan Hall).

Disclaimer
The information contained in this publication has been published to assist public knowledge and discussion and to help improve the sustainable management of land, water and vegetation. Where technical information has been prepared by or contributed by authors, readers should contact the author(s), and conduct their own enquiries, before making use of that information.


Foreword

Sustainable Society

"A sustainable society is one which can exist more or less indefinitely because it is both respectful of, and able to change and adapt to natural limits. .... A sustainable society is one which is economically, ecologically, socially and culturally sustainable."
(Ideas for the New Millennium - Peter Ellyard 1998)

The Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan (SSRSP) recognises that Australia's Coastal Cities are currently not sustainable, typically being under extreme environmental pressure as a result of many years of our society not respecting or changing to adapt to their natural thresholds and carrying capacity. It is therefore of significant societal concern that it is these urban coastal areas, such as the Southern Sydney Region, that support the vast majority of the Australian population and represent the major portion of the Nation's economic base.

Clearly, the quality of life in urban coastal cities is directly linked to a high quality environment. The Southern Sydney Catchments are a prime example - over 1.5 million people reside in a Region which is currently showing significant environmental stress, threatening the quality of life in the Region. For example, the entire Cooks River is closed to recreational fishing to protect the health of consumers due to heavy metal contamination of the aquatic biota.

Our society must begin to develop a vision of what a sustainable society might look like and how we need to change from our currently unsustainable activities of daily living. We must then find the means of achieving sustainability. It is now more critical than ever before to urgently address and reverse the various threatening processes that are putting the urban environments under such severe pressure which has led to its currently unsustainable state. It is quite clear that the community has a responsibility to be involved in achieving the required changes, to get ownership of the problems and the solutions. In fact it is critical that the community be directly involved in this process.

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world. Indeed its the only thing that ever has."
(Margaret Mead - anthropologist).

Southern Sydney communities, particularly through the Southern Sydney Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee (SSRCC) and the four Catchment Management Committees (CMCs) in the Southern Sydney Region (Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay, Hacking River, Cooks River and the Georges River), Catchment Management in partnership with State Agencies, Local Government and other stakeholders already involved, individually and cooperatively, are progressing on many fronts towards achieving sustainable natural resource and environmental management (NREM) and a sustainable society.

The development of the SSRSP is intended to provide a means of helping the community to progress towards sustainablity. The SSRSP identifies a range of carefully considered natural resource and environmental management priorities. They have been compiled in consultation with natural resource managers from State and Local Government, community members and from a number of strategic studies. These priorities represent this collective wisdom for the most effective investment in natural resource management. The priorities have been explicitly selected so as to ensure maximum leverage for shifting the Southern Sydney Catchments towards sustainability.

However, the SSRSP is a dynamic document intended to be revised and updated as needed with a major review within 2 years. This RSP (like many of the other strategic and management plans it will work with and support) represents only Phase I of this process. From this base we need to move as rapidly as opportunities allow to move to Phase II - creating sustainability. It is intended that this move will most likely be part of the major revision of the RSP as it becomes a true strategic focus for future ecologically sustainable development.

Some examples of where we need to move to include:
 
Phase I
- current situation
- actions
Phase II
-Where we need to go from here
- future strategic actions required
address issues (repair) create sustainability (prevention)
reactive actions proactive actions
be problem / symptom centred be solution centred
increase awareness change attitudes
increase appreciation change behaviour
reduce / minimise impacts, etc abolish / prevent impacts, etc.

I am well aware that there are concerns for what many may see as a plethora of plans, strategies or management frameworks, of which this could be seen to be just one more. In this regard, it has been our intent to make this a practical and robust Strategic Plan that openly links to other such plans and will be useful beyond the context of the Natural Heritage Trust (NHT) process. I also encourage all readers to refer to the range of excellent source documents such as the Sydney Coastal Council's Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy, State Agency Plans and CMC Strategic Plans that are referenced in and utilised for this strategy. Wherever possible, this document refers to or supports other such relevant plans.

Please note that due to very tight time constraints, the actions attributed to other agencies and organisations have not been formally agreed to (unless otherwise indicated) and they are in the form of recommendations only.

This SSRSP has been designed for ease of copying, and we are currently working to make it available on the Internet on the DLWC web site early in 1999. In the spirit of openness and cooperation, the SSRSP is offered without copyright for all original material herein, provided that the source is acknowledged.

This SSRSP was developed with the considerable assistance of Kinhill Pty Ltd, the consultants selected to help develop and produce the RSP within a tight time frame. This was necessary in order to make the RSP available to the community as early as possible to facilitate and assist the development of a significantly increased number of strong, well throughout, high quality project proposals to access funding (such as the NHT funding program whose project application deadline is 26 February 1999) and to address the many urgent NREM issues in the Southern Sydney Region's catchments.

NHT Funding History

In recent years, the Southern Sydney Region has typically not received the same level of funding and attention as rural regions for sustainable NREM under the various funding schemes. At the regional level, we have openly sought to change this scenario by developing strong and high quality funding applications and then lobbied hard for adequate funding of those projects. I am delighted that we have made excellent progress in this regard. It is pleasing to note that the Region now has stronger political and bureaucratic support for enhanced funding at both the State and Federal level. This has made it far easier to argue the case for greater funding.

However, competition for scarce grant funds remains very strong, and there are many cultural frameworks and inertia factors within funding allocation processes that disadvantage Southern Sydney. To overcome this and other factors the Southern Sydney Region will continue to need strong support from Local Government, the SSRCC, CMCs, State agencies, and community groups. At the Regional level, this RSP is designed to assist these and other parties in gaining funding for worthwhile projects, and for determining where to allocate scarce resources.

Aboriginal Land Management and Consultation

The Southern Sydney Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee and Department of Land and Water Conservation are committed to ensuring that Aboriginal concerns and issues concerning NREM are addressed. Aboriginal communities have an intimate knowledge of natural resources that needs to be incorporated far more substantially into environmental planning and management than has typically occurred. The SSRCC and DLWC recognise that consultation and participation with Aboriginal communities is critical to effective land and water management policies and achieving a sustainable society. In order to increase indigenous involvement in NREM programs, the following initiatives have been implemented:

For more information about DLWC policies and programs concerning Aboriginal land management issues, please contact Graham Moore on (02) 4929 9856 or Rob Cleg on 0411 229 587.
Figure 1:
Aboriginal Tribal / Clan Boundaries believed to exist in the Greater Sydney Region circa 1788.
Figure 1: Aboriginal Tribal / Clan Boundaries believed to exist in the Greater Sydney Region circa 1788.

 

Aboriginal Concerns and Issues to be Addressed by Project Proposals

The SSRCC wishes to emphasise that all projects, actions and strategies proposed or initiated to address the NREM issues of the Southern Sydney Regional catchments need to address Aboriginal concerns and issues.

All community groups, Local Government, State agencies and other stakeholders involved need to identify, assess and address all Aboriginal concerns and issues associated with, or that may possibly be impacted by those projects, actions and strategies. This should be achieved through early, proactive and effective consultation with the relevant Aboriginal communities and / or individuals and / or organisations.

Aboriginal issues may include current or planned land and native title claims over the areas concerned, known, unknown and potential sites of significance to the Aboriginal communities, and current and historical spiritual and social connections with particular areas, objects and actions.

Wherever possible strategies such as project partnerships with relevant Aboriginal representatives or ongoing consultations or discussions should be facilitated. This will assist with identifying those issues which need to be addressed by a project proposal.

The financial cost of investigations, such as those by Aboriginal Land Councils, will usually be expected to be borne by the proponents of successfully funded projects. Therefore, proposed project budgets should make provision (as appropriate) for the cost of formal Aboriginal investigations required to identify and determine any Aboriginal issues and their significance associated with a particular project's planned actions and / or area (s) of operation.

Acknowledgments

The preparation of the (Interim) Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan as been made possible by the dedication and assistance of many people. The substantial support and input provided by the following people with regard to guiding development, background information, ideas and also for reviewing the document in a short time frame, is acknowledged and genuinely appreciated.

I would like to thank all those people who have made such an important contribution thus far and look forward to your continuing support and feedback in order to support the process, particularly as this document is an "interim" document until the final version which will refined with a number of additions and improvements, is printed early next year. This will allow the SSRSP to further develop and produce additional and increasingly relevant strategies, actions and action / business plans to help achieve a sustainable environment (ecologically, socially, culturally and economically) into 2000 and beyond for the Southern Sydney Region and its catchments.

graphic signature

Peter Wells

Chair of the Southern Sydney Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee, and Chair, Hacking River Catchment Management Committee.

December 1999.


1. Introduction

Introduction

In recent years, the community has become very much more aware of, and vocal about the urgent need to do something to ensure that our society becomes sustainable and our environment is managed, restored and protected for our future generations. That we must take action to repair the damage that has been done and stop the continuing damage. There is also a greater realisation that we must all take individual responsibility and participate in the process of natural resource and environmental management (NREM) by ensuring that our activities and lifestyles are sustainable. In particular, there is a greater awareness that effective NREM requires a commitment at an individual and local level, in partnership with Governments at all levels, Local, State and Federal.

Since the UN Commission of Environment met in 1972 and the 'environment movement' has gained real momentum, the community has become aware of the need to 'think globally, act locally'. In terms of catchment management, community groups working together on improving their local environment have evolved to the point where the NSW Catchment Management Act was proclaimed in 1989.

This community spirit and momentum has been harnessed in order to develop the Regional Strategic Plan for the Southern Sydney Region.

Under the Catchment Management Act four Catchment Management Committees have been established in the Southern Sydney Region.

The Regional and catchments boundaries of the Southern Sydney Region are shown in Figure 2.
 
Figure 2 Southern Sydney Regional and Catchment boundaries
Figure 2 Southern Sydney Regional and Catchment boundaries (enlargement)

Aim of the "Interim" Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan

The aim of the Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan (RSP) is to guide investment into integrated NREM to achieve sustainability. It will accomplish that through:

  1. Identifying, describing and ranking / prioritising the regional NREM Issues and threatening processes or pressures that have and are causing the often severe environmental degradation and problems in the Region. It will identify and address 'causes' of environmental degradation, not just the symptoms
  2. Identifying and describing the associated Key Result Areas needed to address those issues, and
  3. Suggesting a range of Strategies / Actions (focusing to a large extent on integrated approaches) to address the Key issues and achieve the Key Results and integrated NREM in the Southern Sydney Region.
This will be achieved through the efforts of the community, in partnership with Government, under the coordination of the CMCs, and assisted by the SSRCC. Relationships between the various "Catchment" committees, levels of government, other stakeholders and the community are shown in Figure 3.
 
Figure 3 Relationships between Catchment committees, levels of government, other stakeholders and the community.
Figure 3 Relationships between Catchment committees, levels of government, other stakeholders and the community. (enlargement)

Objectives of Regional Strategic Plan

The Regional Strategic Plan (RSPs) is an 'umbrella' document which is intended to complement and support other relevant existing regional strategic planning reports / instruments such as the Green Web (Remnant Vegetation Mapping) and the Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy. The Green Web is shown in Figure 4. The Southern Sydney RSP has been adopted to provide an appropriate framework that will help to:

to ensure effective and sustainable natural resource management.

The RSP focuses on what individuals and the community can do in partnership with all levels of government and non-government organisations, to achieve desired objectives. The focus is directed at "on-ground works" or "education and awareness raising and capacity building activities" that form part of strategic initiatives aimed at integrated natural resource management, which leads to demonstrable and sustainable on-ground restoration and improvements in the region's catchments.

The RSP brings together and integrates information from documents such as the Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy, Local Environmental Plans, State of the Environment Reports, Catchment Management Plans, Stormwater Management Plans, CMC Strategic Plans, Sydney Water Plan initiatives, NSW Fisheries Habitat Management Plans and other Environmental Plans of Management.

Development of the Regional Strategic Plan

This Regional Strategic Plan has been developed from the Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan Framework document. It was prepared in February 1998 after a number of joint meetings of the Southern Sydney and Southern Sydney Regional Organisations (as they were known at that time). A list of 'causes' or 'threatening processes' affecting the Regions was compiled and expanded in consultation with a working party from both Regional Organisations. Threatening processes were classified as 'high', 'medium' or 'low'.

The RSP Framework was further developed into this 'Interim' RSP later in the year, particularly over a second four week period with input from stakeholders at a workshop in November, 1998. The imposition of a short time frame and some significant last minute technological (computer) glitches has meant that some of non-critical information was omitted from the "Interim" RSP in order to get the document out in time to be used in developing projects under the NHT Funding process. As a result of the tight time frame, there will inevitably be issues which have been overlooked or given insufficient attention. Some stakeholders may feel that certain issues may require further investigation and additional appropriate actions for implementation identified. Hence, as this is both and "interim", and will continue to be a "living" document which is designed to be reviewed and amended over its proposed functional six year life, your continued ideas, constructive criticisms, comments and input will be very welcomed.
 
Figure 4 Green Web Remnant Vegetation Mapping Sydney Region
Figure 4 Green Web Remnant Vegetation Mapping Sydney Region (enlargement)


Literature Review

An extensive literature review was undertaken during preparation of the RSP. Documents reviewed included:

Relevant strategic actions were noted for inclusion in the group sessions at the workshops that were held to identify key issues and outcomes.

All reports that were reviewed are noted in the References and Bibliography section of this document

What is Total Catchment Management?

Total Catchment Management (TCM) is defined in the New South Wales Catchment Management Act (1989) as the coordinated and sustainable use and management of land, water, vegetation and other natural resources, on a water catchment basis, to balance resource use and conservation. It provides the structure for integrated natural resource management in New South Wales (NSW).

In practice, TCM has three separate elements:

In 1996-97 the TCM program in NSW was reviewed. One outcome of this review was the recommendation that the TCM framework be extended to cover 100% of NSW. Accordingly all of the Sydney metropolitan area is now represented by CMCs.

TCM has been progressively implemented in NSW since the introduction of the Act. Over this time, the TCM program, coordinated through the Department of Land and Water Conservation (DLWC), has developed into the primary community-government partnership for achieving sustainable natural resources management in NSW.

Underlying Principles of TCM

The review of TCM identified the following principles as being central to effective natural resource management, at a catchment scale:

In line with the underlying TCM principles, the CMCs must now develop Strategic Plans to guide the development of Action Plans for 'on-ground' project development at both a regional and local level. This RSP will assist that process..

Water Resource Management and Water Reforms

The NSW State of the Environment Report 1997 identifies water as one of the most important natural resources, the effective management of which is a major environmental challenge. The health of waterways is a high priority and comprehensive water reform packages to address the health and sustainability of NSW rivers are being introduced. The water reforms fall into three key areas (after NSW State of Environment Report, 1997):

This RSP endorses and aims to achieve equivalent water quality and river flow objectives to those recently endorsed by Cabinet in the document "Setting water quality and river flow objectives for Sydney Harbour and Parramatta River Catchments", prepared by the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) . The information in that document will help guide the development of water quality objectives and monitoring of on-ground activities undertaken by both the community and government in the Southern Sydney Region.

Characteristics of the Southern Sydney Region

The Southern Sydney Region is comprised of the Georges, Hacking and Cooks River and the Sydney Eastern Beaches/Botany Bay catchments. It covers an area of 1317 km2 with a population of approximately 1.66M. The catchment extends from the Local Government areas of Waverley, south along the coastline to Stanwell Park and inland to near Appin, north west to Campbelltown and north to Prospect Reservoir, Fairfield and Bankstown. It includes up to 17 Local Government areas.

The Region comprises mostly of a coastal basin which has an important RAMSAR wetland (Towra Point - in Botany Bay) in its estuarine reaches and has an impressive history associated with the development of Aboriginal culture and the birth and development of Sydney. There exist a number of important ecosystems and threatened communities including the Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub and the clay shale forests in the Cooks River catchment. It contains a number of significant terrestrial and marine protected areas including Royal, Heathcote, Georges River and Botany Bay National Parks, Leacock Regional Park, Towra Point and Shiprock Aquatic Reserves and several Intertidal Protected Areas.

The Georges River catchment, the largest within the Southern Sydney Region, supports a variety of land uses, from agriculture (grazing, dairying, market gardens, etc.) and oyster leases to nuclear research facilities and extractive industries. At present 69% of the catchment is open space and 24% residential. Its major tributary, the Woronora River, supplies drinking water to parts of southern Sydney.

The Hacking River catchment is unique for an urban catchment with about 60% of the total area consisting of the Royal National Park and Garawarra State Recreation Area, the remainder is residential land in the north and semi-rural townships in the south. Other land uses include; catchment protection, conservation, light industry, recreation and commercial uses. Much of the catchment forms the eastern part of the larger Woronora Plateau and due to its topography delivers high rainfall to the Sydney region.

The Cooks River catchment is located within the inner southwestern Sydney area. It begins as a small watercourse near Bankstown and flows 23 kilometres in an easterly direction to Botany Bay (near Kingsford Smith Airport). The catchment is highly developed and industrialised which has resulted in severely impacted habitats and water quality, making the Cooks River one of the most environmentally degraded water courses in NSW.

The Sydney Eastern Beaches/Botany Bay area extends south along the coastline from the Local Government areas of Waverley to Botany Bay and west to the border of the Cooks River Catchment. It boasts great beaches, rugged coastlines and expansive recreational areas.

The Georges, Cooks and Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay CMCs all border Botany Bay which has its own set of significant environmental problems and management issues due mainly to being a major port and its adjacent land uses (such as Kingsford Smith Airport and oil refineries). Botany Bay also has many important historical / cultural and ecological features such as the Kurnell Peninsular and the Towra Point wetlands.

The Southern Sydney Region is a complex ecosystem with energy flows affecting the evolution, geography and uses of the natural environment. The habitats that comprise the Region are complex, sensitive, patchy and variable, and they require connectivity to remain functional. Where intertidal areas have not been removed, there exists land-based habitats such as mangroves, mud-flats and sandy beaches, along with marine habitats including rock platforms, reefs and seagrass beds, where marine and estuarine species form complex ecological assemblages (Underwood and Chapman, 1998).

Any planning and management strategy for the Southern Sydney Region must recognise the energy flows and ecosystem connections that dominate ecological processes. Both tidal exchange and freshwater flows from heavy rain supply both food and oxygen. Urban runoff now also brings chemicals, sewage, rubbish and sediments into the waterways, along with water and nutrients (ibid, 1998).

The waterways are also characterised by ecosystem 'patches', which include rock platforms, intertidal areas such as mangrove forests, and open sea habitats. Appropriate connections must be maintained between them to keep them viable. Maintaining habitat linkages and habitat diversity is a requirement of maintaining ecological values. On a regional scale, as for the Sydney Harbour Region, the Southern Sydney Region represents an important link in the coastal habitats along the eastern seaboard of Australia.

Key issues associated with waterway ecology of the Southern Sydney Region (after Underwood and Chapman, 1998) include:

References include:


2 Development of the Regional Strategic Plan

2.1 Structure of the Regional Strategic Plan

The focus of the Interim SSRSP is the identification of Key Regional Priority Issues (or Threatening Processes) and Key Result Areas, which identify the outcomes, desired by stakeholders or needed to achieve ESD. There are six core steps in the process of developing the Regional Strategic Plan. These are as follows:

  1. Identify the Vision and associated environmental, cultural, economic and social values for the Region;
  2. Identify Regional Priority Issues (or Threatening Processes);
  3. Identify Key Result Areas;
  4. Identify and suggest possible Strategies and Actions to achieve the desired outcomes for the Key Result Areas;
  5. Identify and suggest likely primary and secondary responsibilities for suggested Strategies / Actions
  6. Monitor and evaluate projects progressively.

The Key Result Areas are associated with a number of suggested or possible Strategies / Actions, which will assist in achieving the 'Vision' and 'Missions' of this document.

The Priority Issues, Key Result Areas and Strategies / Actions are presented as a table, which also identifies persons, agencies or groups that may or should have primary and secondary responsibilities for undertaking the action. As indicated in the Foreword, due to very tight time constraints, the actions attributed to other agencies and organisations have not been formally agreed to (unless otherwise indicated) and they are in the form of recommendations only. The 'Time Frame' represents either the expected duration of an actual project undertaking the action, or the time frame involved in addressing / achieving the key result. It is intended and hoped (and critical if further funding is desired) that all projects will have effective, lasting, and sustainable results well beyond their own project time frame.

2.2 Monitoring and Evaluation

In order to ensure that project 'Strategies / Actions' are undertaken according to the originally agreed project program of works (ie. as per that outlined in an application for funding) and their relative success in achieving their stated objectives, monitoring and evaluation of all project 'Actions' must be undertaken. This allows for accountability and transparency for those evaluating the success of the Strategy and on-ground projects. It also assists those who are preparing to undertake future projects to assess whether a particular project methodology or program has been successful in achieving or progressing significantly toward the desired outcome or 'Key Result'.

Successful monitoring and evaluation of projects evolves with stakeholder awareness of the actions required to achieve NREM. To save reinventing the wheel and in order to achieve consistency with monitoring and evaluation of projects, the Commonwealth Natural Heritage Trust Core Indicators have been used as a reference wherever possible.

Project monitoring, evaluation and reporting play an important role in measuring the success and progress of a project and help with the development of work programs for future projects. The Natural Heritage Trust (NHT), which is overseen by the Commonwealth Government, has appointed officers to develop Core Indicators in consultation with the States. The goal of the NHT Core Indicators is to contribute to the evaluation of the effectiveness of the NHT, its component programs and projects, and the efficiency of delivery mechanisms. A State Monitoring and Evaluation Unit will be staffed from February 1999 to oversee the success of NHT funded projects.

The Key Result Areas determined by regional stakeholders in the RSP are similar or in many cases identical to those determined for the NHT Core indicators.


3. Key Regional Priority Issues & Action Tables

Warning IconPrinting

Key Regional Priority Issues

Key Regional Priority Issues

Action Tables

  1. Integrated Natural Resource Management
  2. Water Quality, Loss of Wetlands
  3. Declining Quality and Quantity of Urban Bushland, Remnant and Other Vegetation
  4. Air Quality - Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, and Sea Level Rise
  5. Changes and Loss in Ecosystem and Species Diversity, Loss of Fishery Habitats
  6. Loss of Cultural and Natural Heritage
  7. Land Degradation
  8. Waste and Litter
  9. Urban Development and Urban Practices
  10. Depletion of Natural Resources
  11. Coastal Dunes, Foreshore and Beach Structure Issues
  12. Depletion of Water Resources, Altered Flow Regimes, Loss of Good Quality Groundwater

3.1 Key regional priority issues and principle strategies

The Southern Sydney Regional Priorities are ranked in the following table, along with the Principle Strategies for addressing each issue (Editors Note: Some copies of this manuscript have priorities 3 and 4 interchanged - B Hall):

Key Regional Priority Issues Principle Strategy
1. Integrated Natural Resource Management
  • Implement a holistic approach to NREM in the Southern Sydney Region by facilitating greater resource sharing and inter-agency cooperation concerning environmental issues between State agencies, local government, Aboriginal people, Regional Organisations of Councils, CMCs, the Community and other stakeholders. 
  • Promote the integration of local government programs identified in the State of the Environment Reports and ensure that cross-boundary efforts within the Region are complementary, rather than isolated or conflicting.
2. Water quality, loss of wetlands
  • Promote and support actions to address protection of water quality, waterway values, wetlands and impacts associated with sedimentation and eutrophication.
  • Actively support National Wetlands Program
  • Support aims and objectives of the NSW Stormwater Action Plan (with reference to local stormwater management plans) and assist local government and CMCs in the implementation of those plans.
3. Declining Quality and Quantity of Urban Bushland, remnant and other vegetation
  • Promote an integrated approach to vegetation management to protect, conserve and enhance remnant bushland throughout the Southern Sydney Region.
  • Actively support the Green Web and ensure that all bushland and bush care efforts in the Southern Sydney
  • Region further the aims and objectives of that program
  • (Editors Note: Some copies of this manuscript have priorities 3 and 4 interchanged - B Hall)
4. Poor air quality - greenhouse gases, climate change, sea level rise 
  • Support current programs and innovative solutions to achieve and maintain air quality with the Southern Sydney Region at a level conducive to long term human and ecosystem health
  • Actively support NSW Greenhouse Actions, as defined in the NSW Greenhouse Action Plan
  • Facilitate actions to implement policies as described in Coast and Clean Seas guide 'Responding to Rising Seas and Climate Change'.
  • (Editors Note: Some copies of this manuscript have priorities 3 and 4 interchanged - B Hall)
5. Changes and Loss in Ecosystem and Species Diversity, Loss of Fishery Habitats
  • Support existing programs and promote innovative solutions to protect and enhance ecological communities and biodiversity in the Southern Sydney Region
6. Loss of Cultural and Natural Heritage
  • Support programs that protect and conserve cultural and natural heritage within the Southern Sydney Region in consultation with Aboriginal communities, land managers, NESB peoples and the general community. 
7. Land Degradation
  • Promote innovative solutions to Land Degradation issues in consultation with the community to prevent further degradation and rehabilitate existing degraded land within the Southern Sydney Region
8. Waste and Litter
  • Promote and support programs that encourage changes in attitude and behaviour amongst all facets of the community to minimise, reduce, reuse and recycle waste and abolish litter.
  • Support stormwater management planning and actions that reduce and prevent litter on land and in waterways. 
9. Urban Development and Urban Practices
  • Support and promote programs and policies that ensure urban development proceeds in a manner which meet ESD principals and recognises cultural and natural heritage values of the region to ensure these values are protected in perpetuity.
  • Facilitate actions to support environmental best practice to promote the adoption of those practices by all stakeholders including local and state government agencies as applicable.
  • Promote and support implementation of changes in the emphasis and to relevant provisions of the current EP&A Act and relevant provisions and guidelines of the Land and Environment Court Act, from requiring consenting / certifying authorities to substantiate that an appealed proposal is not ecologically sustainable, - to requiring the proponent to substantiate their ESD claims
10. Depletion of Natural Resources
  • Promote and support implementation of appropriate policies, practices and procedures for resource and land use planning that incorporate the principles of ESD. 
11. Coastal Dunes, Foreshore and Beach Structure Issues
  • Support and promote the Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy and the NSW Coastal Policy.
  • Support and promote appropriate planning and development in coastal and foreshore areas which address coastal processes and protect natural coastal structures and remnant original coastal ecosystems.
12}
  1. Depletion of Water Resources
  2. Altered Flow Regimes and
  3. Loss of good quality groundwater
  • Promote and support actions and strategies which ensure adequate environmental flows to sustain healthy aquatic ecosystems, whilst providing adequate water for human use and minimising risk of flooding.

3.2 Priority regional issues / key results - strategy / action tables

Priority Ranking of Regional Issues - Southern Sydney Region
 

Rank Regional Issue
1. Integrated Natural Resource Management
2. Water Quality, Sediments and Loss of Wetlands
3. Declining Quality and Quantity of Urban Bushland, Remnant and Other Vegetation
4. Air Quality - Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, Sea Level Rise
5. Changes and Loss in Ecosystem and Species Diversity, Loss of Fishery Habitats
6. Loss of Cultural and Natural Heritage
7. Land Degradation
8. Waste and Litter
9. Urban Development and Urban Practices
10. Depletion of Natural Resources
 11. Coastal Dunes, Foreshore and Beach Structure Issues
 12.} { (a) Depletion of Water Resources

{ (b) Altered Flow Regimes 

{ (c) Loss of Good Quality Groundwater


3.3 How to use the Action Tables

PRIORITY KEY RESULT AREAS STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary  Secondary 

TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Identifies the priority result determined at the Workshops and in relevant Strategic Plans

Identifies the desired outcomes that can and need to be achieved by stakeholder involvement in the management of NREM issues.

Strategies / Actions are recommended options that stakeholders can carry out to meet the Key Results. The level of detail may vary from issue to issue.

This is not meant to be exhaustive list of all actions and strategies. It is designed as a base guide to possible actions and strategies and to encourage and assist the development of other creative and innovative solutions.

The stakeholders identified are considered to be the main groups responsible for undertaking the Strategy / Action.

The stakeholders identified are secondary groups responsible for undertaking the strategy / action.

The expected time frame may be presented as a completion date, or as an estimate period in cases where a project or Strategy / Action is longer term or may be ongoing but dependent upon further resources.

Many projects and Strategy / Actions will be ongoing

This column is used by the lead stakeholder to record implementation of the strategy / action and meeting of the target. Project milestones may also be determined.


Note:

  1. Where a stakeholder agency or group appears at the top of one of the boxes in the table's Responsibility and Monitoring column, and there are no other stakeholders identified below, means that the identified agency or group is responsible for all of the Strategies/Actions identified in that particular component.
  2. Actions attributed to other agencies or stakeholders identified under the heading of Primary and Secondary Responsibility throughout the Action Tables are initial and indicative only at this stage, or need considerable further refining. Agencies have not formally agreed to, or 'signed off' on adopting these responsibilities (except where they have already signed off under other Strategies and Plans).
  3. Monitoring and evaluation is indicative only. Many stakeholders will have some responsibilities for monitoring and evaluation of project and result.

Action Table 1

1) Integrated Natural Resource Management

Principle Strategy:
A holistic approach to natural resource management in the Southern Sydney Region. To be achieved by facilitating greater resource sharing and regional and interagency cooperation concerning environmental issues between:

  1. State Agencies,
  2. Local Government,
  3. Aboriginal Communities,
  4. Regional Organisations of Councils,
  5. Catchment Management Committees, and
  6. Other stakeholders and the community.

Key Result Areas:


HIGH PRIORITY: 1.1 Awareness and commitment to NREM by all stakeholders
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote the awareness of and commitment to the principles and practice of TCM & ESD to all stakeholders (Community, Local Govt., Agencies)

Convene training workshops and forums to educate the Community, Local Govt. and Agencies

Provide forums for resolving natural resource conflicts and issues

Develop specialised integrated education strategies and materials aimed at Non-English Speaking Background (NESB) communities to raise awareness of and implement TCM philosophies and practices in their communities, schools, etc. throughout the region

Develop Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with key stakeholders to secure commitment in the implementation of specific Plans of Management (PoMs) and strategy/actions

Improve the accessibility of quality NREM data and knowledge and the rigour of monitoring programs

CMCs & RCC,
DLWC

Plus ethnic affairs

Plus relevant plan authors plus local Government and State Agencies

All Local Govt. and State Agencies
Ongoing Who: CMCs, RCCs, Govt

What: CMC annual reports, RCC progress and final reports and Local Govt/State Agency annual reports

When: Annually


HIGH PRIORITY: 1.2 Coordination of integrated NREM strategies, procedures and practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Recognise and foster the positive linkages between Local Govt. and State Agency strategies and programs throughout the Region (Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy, Water and Vegetation Reforms, Green Web - Sydney, etc)
- Improve communication and information flow between State Govt. Agencies, Local Govt., RCC, CMCs and the community

- Advise on and coordinate the NREM activities of authorities, groups and individuals

- Coordinate and integrate the preparation of strategic programs for funding

- Coordinate available NREM data in line with Regional and catchment needs and support projects/programs that address data gaps

- Monitor, evaluate and report on performance of NREM strategies and programs

- Development of standard regional indicators for SoE reporting

- Lobby Local Govt. and State Agencies to adopt a standard information system (Database) to facilitate information via the Internet

RCC. CMCs, Sydney Coastal, Council Groups, ROCs,

Local Govt., State Agencies,

CMCs/RCCs

CMCs/RCC

RCC

CMCs/RCC

Community and all Stakeholders

Local Govt./ROCs

All Stakeholders

CMCs

Local Govt., State Agencies & Community

State Agencies

Ongoing Who: Various

What: All relevant procedures

When: Annual


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 1.3 Commitment to educate and enforce environmental and planning laws
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Investigate ways to educate decision makers in the Land and Environment Court

- Convene workshops for community groups on environmental and planning laws

- Streamline the enforcement responsibilities and improve working relationships between Local Govt. and State Agencies to ensure rapid response to breaches of Environmental and Planning Legislation

- Examine ways to assist Local Govt. and State Agencies to employ law education and enforcement officers, eg. outsourcing to private companies

- Support efforts to assess the efficacy of all environmental and planning law, convene Forums/Workshops

Local Govt. and State Agencies in conjunction with the EDO

Local Govt. and State Agencies

Local Govt. and State Agencies

In conjunction with the EDO

CMCs/RCC Community

CMCs/RCC Community

CMCs/Local Govt/State Agencies

1 year

ongoing

Who: Various

What: EP&A Act/NREM Policy

When: Annual


Action Table 2

2) Water Quality, Loss of Wetlands

Principle Strategy:
Protection of water quality, waterway values, and impacts associated with sedimentation and eutrophication.

Key Result Areas:
  • 2.1 Improve urban runoff and stormwater management practices and ownership
  • 2.2 Reduce or prevent sewerage overflows
  • 2.3 Reduce / prevent litter
  • 2.4 Inappropriate effluent disposal
  • 2.5 Increase community awareness, understanding and involvement to change attitudes and behaviour
  • 2.6 Community awareness, understanding and involvement
  • 2.7 Reduce / prevent sedimentation
  • 2.8 Reduce / prevent stream and estuary foreshore erosion
  • 2.9 Improve / reduce impact of recreational and commercial aquatic uses
  • 2.10 Reduce/prevent Industrial discharges
  • 2.11 Reduce / prevent excessive levels of organic matter
  • 2.12 Minimise / reduce changes to streamflow regimes
  • 2.13 Improve Riparian zone management
  • 2.14 Reduce / prevent loss of native aquatic biota
  • 2.16 Reduce / prevent leachate causing contamination
  • 2.17 Reduce / prevent contamination from point and non-point source discharges
  • 2.18 Reduce / prevent aquatic weeds
  • 2.19 Improve dredging/extractive industries - management practices
  • 2.20 Improve flood management practices
  • 2.21 Reduce / prevent foreshore erosion
  • 2.22 Reduce / prevent introduction of and control of marine and exotic pests
  • 2.23 Prevent disturbance of acid sulphate soils

HIGH PRIORITY: 2.1 Improve urban runoff and stormwater management practices and ownership
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Improve information flow between Sydney Water, government authorities and CMCs (ie pollutant type and source research results)

- Undertake monitoring program's and source identification of heavy metals and other pollutants not covered by existing research material

- Support SMPs

- Coordinate community and Industry education

- Improve compliance with Environmental Assessment and safeguards

- Support point source management initiatives

- Improve on site retention

- Undertake street sweeping

- Install and maintain litter control devices (LCDs)

- Create instream wetlands

- Undertake dechannelisation

- Plan for creek buffers

- Proper signage and recognition of waterways

-Community adoption and naming (to develop local pride, ownership and responsibility) of local water ways, creeks etc. (inc. one that are now drains!)

- Grass swales and other 'soft' design options

- Increase area of porous surfaces

- Undertake sediment trap sampling to identify pollution sources

Sydney Water

RTA, EPA NSW Fisheries

Local Govt, Universities, EPA, RTA, NSW Fisheries

Local Govt, EPA, CMCs Sydney Water

Local Govt, Community/ Industries Sydney Water

Local Govt, Community Gps, Govt agencies where appropriate Local Govt Community Gps, Local Govt

DLWC

EPA

Stormwater Industry Association

Universities

NSW Fisheries

Sydney Water

Ongoing Who: All

What: Various

When: Ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 2.2 Reduce or prevent sewerage overflows
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Increase expected standard

- Introduce mandatory sewage piping inspections at sale of private property

- Upgrade sewerage infrastructure

- Control illegal connections

Sydney Water Department of Health,

DLWC,

Department of Local Government,

EPA

NSW Fisheries

Ongoing Who: All

What: Various

When: Ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 2.3 Reduce / prevent litter
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Waste table
   
   

HIGH PRIORITY: 2.4 Inappropriate effluent disposal
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary

TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Coordinate education / compliance

- Implement "dob-in" offence reporting programs with incentives provided

- Identification / tracing / source control

Sydney Water

EPA

CMCs NSW Fisheries

Transport companies

Ongoing Who: Sydney Water

What: Infiltration and exfiltration studies 

When: Ongoing


2.5 Increase community awareness, understanding and involvement to change attitudes and behaviour
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop and implement Community "Adopt/name a drain/creek/waterway ...." to develop local pride, ownership and responsibility for local waterways, creeks etc. (inc. former creeks - now drains)

- Implement "The rights of waterways" education programs -personify water bodies to indicate issues at hand

- Drain stenciling

CMCs,

Community Gps,

Local Govt

DLWC

Local Govt

Schools and universities

NSW Fisheries

Ongoing Who: CMCs and DLWC

What: Number of attendees to education programs and amount of media exposure

When: Ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 2.6 Community awareness, understanding and involvement
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop demonstration projects 

- Increase school and university involvement 

- Target all ethnic and cultural backgrounds

+ Universities, schools, etc. Community Gps, Local Govt

as above + Ethnic Affairs, Cultural/ Ethnic/ religious organisations

NSW Fisheries
   

HIGH PRIORITY: 2.7 Reduce / prevent sedimentation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Enforce best practice sedimentation construction stage controls

- Enforce progressive revegetation and vegetation removal controls

Local Govt

EPA

DLWC

CMCs
Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Construction site audits

When: During construction phase


HIGH PRIORITY: 2.8 Reduce / prevent stream and estuary foreshore erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop bank/ bed protection programs

- Investigate the impacts of past dredging works / structures and utilise this material in the development of better harbour designs

- Improve speed signage for water vehicles

- Revegetate riparian zones

- Create 'No Wash' zones

- Support vegetated buffer zones on foreshores

DLWC

CMCs

Local Govt

Coastcare

Bushcare

Dunecare

Universities

NSW Fisheries

Ongoing Who: CMCs and Local Govt

What: Various - refer NHT Core Indicators

When: SoER and after major storm events


HIGH PRIORITY: 2.9 Improve / reduce impact of recreational and commercial aquatic uses
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Facilitate cross agency policing

- Implement education programs

- Coordinate Project Aware Programs

- Facilitate zoning in conjunction with management plans

- Improve signage

Harbour Master (DUAP)

NSW Fisheries

NPWS, Local Govt

DLWC

CMCs

Ongoing Who: Various

What: policies / programs

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 2.10 Reduce/prevent Industrial discharges
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Community Education (eg. applying the Kids Companies, Creeks program to the region)

- enforce current legislation

- develop "abuser pays" strategies

Local Govt

Community,

EPA

CMCs ,

Schools,

NSW Fisheries

Ongoing Who: CMCs

What: No of projects run and education/awareness projects funded

When: annual


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.11 Reduce / prevent excessive levels of organic matter
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Improve community awareness of garden waste disposal methods and their implications

- Storm water control - please see above

Local Govt CMCs

DLWC

Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Reduction in organic matter

When: SoER


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.12 Minimise / reduce changes to streamflow regimes
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Altered Flow Regimes table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.13 Improve Riparian zone management
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Undertake education

- Improve compliance / enforcement

- Improve reporting mechanisms

- Implement environmental compensation policies (no net loss)

- Create a database of existing bioregion / habitat ie. Green Web

- Improve habitat reinstatement

DLWC

Local Govt

ROCs/DLWC

Local Govt /DLWC/ Community

CMCs

NSW Fisheries

Ongoing Who: All

What: Percentage of stream length revegetated including width and value

When: Core NHT Indicators

SoER

State Rivercare records


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.14 Reduce / prevent loss of native aquatic biota
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Educate fishing industry

- Educate commercial fishers

- Support research into aquatic species and monitor population dynamics and threatening processes

NSW Fisheries

Universities

Local Govt Community
Ongoing Who: Dept Fisheries/Universities

What: Fisheries Production/health of benthic and mobile invertebrate and seagrass communities.

When: Ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.15 Reduce / prevent illegal dumping
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Enforce legislation 

- Implement "dob in" program's

EPA

CMC, Local Govt

Local Govt
Ongoing Who: EPA

What: No of incidences noted and convicted

When: Annual reports


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.16 Reduce / prevent leachate causing contamination
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Assist Local Govt to upgrade waste management facilities

- Encourage identification of other leachate sources

Local Govt EPA
Ongoing Who: EPA

What: Waste facilities upgraded

When: SoER


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.17 Reduce / prevent contamination from point and non-point source discharges
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Urban runoff and stormwater management practices and ownership section above
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.18 Reduce / prevent aquatic weeds
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Implement ballast water control procedures

- Advertise noxious weeds within community

- Identify weeds that require controlled removal and implement working bees to remove

DLWC

Local Govt

AQIS

CMCs

NSW Fisheries

Ongoing Who: Local Govt, CMCs

What: Areas identified and cleared of weeds

When: Ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.19 Improve dredging/extractive industries - management practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Refer to NSW Dredging and Extractive Industries Policy

- Support community initiatives for use of renewable resources eg. crushed waste concrete

State Govt.

Local Govt

NSW Fisheries

 
Ongoing Who: State Govt

What: Refer to policy

When: Refer to policy


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.20 Improve flood management practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Altered Flow Regimes table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.21 Reduce / prevent foreshore erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Increases vegetation cover

- Fence access trails and provide signage

Local Govt

Dunecare

Coastcare

NPWS NSW Fisheries
Ongoing Who: DLWC, NPWS

What: Erosion controls implemented

When: Annually


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.22 Reduce / prevent introduction of and control of marine and exotic pests
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Implement ballast water control procedures
Cth, AQIS

NSW Fisheries

DLWC, Waterways
Ongoing Who: DLWC

What: Pests identified and eradication programs implemented 

When: Ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 2.23 Prevent disturbance of acid sulphate soils
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Identify and map high risk areas for ASS

- Manage areas with high risk of ASS (and potential for degradation of water quality) by applying management principles:

- Avoidance; oxidation prevention; acid neutralisation; leachate collection and treatment; pyrite separation. 

Developers, DLWC, Local Govt. 

DUAP

Existing landholders in high risk areas
Ongoing Who: DLWC

What: Numbers of fish kills reported caused by ASS disturbance - report and review current policies and practices if increases.

When: annual reporting and after events


Action Table 3

3) Declining Quality and Quantity of Urban Bushland, Remnant and Other Vegetation

Principle Strategy:
Protect, conserve and enhance remaining remnant bushland through co-ordination of a uniform approach to vegetation management across the Southern Sydney Region.
HIGH PRIORITY: 3.1 Increase local native species representation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Raise awareness

- Develop a directory of existing community native spp. nurseries

- Support the development of community nurseries

- Support appropriate and supervised bush regeneration 

- Encourage use of local natives in landscaping

- Support and utilise the Native Seed Savers Network 

CMCs

Bushcare

NPWS

Greening Aust

Local Govt
Ongoing Who: Govt agencies all levels

What: Condition and area of native species restored

When: In conjunction with SoE reporting - annually (SoER)


HIGH PRIORITY: 3.2 Establish, maintain and improve native vegetation links and corridors
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage Local Govt to endorse the Green Web 

- Encourage Local Govt to implement Green Web actions (milestones and ongoing )

- Update the Green Web mapping

- Co-ordinate neighbouring regeneration activities

- Undertake and support sustainable management of existing remnants (collection, propagation)

- Investigate needs and where necessary develop and erect suitable fencing or build paths/walkways to protect sensitive areas/spp., etc. and to control/manage access to reduce impacts of trampling, collecting, etc.

CMCs, ROCs

Greening Aust

WESROC/ DLWC

Local Govt

CMCs, ROCs Local Govt

CMCs, ROCs Community groups

Local Govt, DLWC
Ongoing Who: CMCs and Local Govt

What: Location and configuration of vegetation corridors

When: SoER


HIGH PRIORITY: 3.3 Improve land use planning and implementation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Urban Development and Urban Practices and Land Degradation matrices
   
   

HIGH PRIORITY: 3.4 Improve urban stormwater and runoff management practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Water Quality table
   
   

HIGH PRIORITY: 3.5 Reduce or prevent sedimentation and nutrient enrichment
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Water Quality table
   
   

HIGH PRIORITY: 3.6 Increase community awareness, involvement and understanding
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Raise awareness of damaging behaviours through education and training

- Develop integrated education strategies and materials to raise awareness of issues and impacting practices 

- Develop specialised integrated education strategies and materials aimed at Non-English Speaking Background (NESB) communities to raise awareness of issues and impacting practices

- Improve management of recreated areas eg. golf courses and playing fields

- Promote regeneration programs - community, schools, universities etc.

- Support bush friendly recreational activities

CMCs

Bushcare

Local Govt

Universities

Schools

Ethnic Affairs

Rec Clubs

Sport and Rec

  Who: All

What: Survey of attitudes and behaviours/ No. of courses held and number attended. 

When: Annually


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 3.7 Reduce or prevent soil erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Land Degradation table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 3.8 Reduce Greenhouse gas emissions
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Air Quality table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 3.9 Prevent inappropriate fire regimes
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Coordinate disaster planning - proactive management

- Identify existing PoMs

- Incorporate fire regimes into vegetation management

- Identify fire prone areas and control burning areas and map on GIS

NPWS

NSW Bushfire Council

Local Govt

NSW Government

Bushfire Brigades

  Who: NPWS

What: Establishment of appropriate fire policy and mapping material

When: Ongoing


LOW PRIORITY: 3.10 Reduce / prevent contamination
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Land Degradation table
   
   

Action Table 4

4) Air Quality - Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, and Sea Level Rise

Principle Strategy:
Support current programs and innovative solutions to achieve and maintain air quality within the Southern Sydney Region at a level conducive to long term human and ecosystem health.
HIGH PRIORITY: 4.1 Reverse / prevent declining urban vegetation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Decrease rates of clearing

- Implement vegetation protection ordinances

- Implement controls on clearing for new developments

Local Govt, State Agencies Developers, Community Gps
Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Hectares protected, declare hectares cleared

When: annual SoER.


HIGH PRIORITY: 4.2 Increase / promote community education, understanding and involvement
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Highlight the relationship between vegetation clearance, air quality and greenhouse emissions
Govt agencies

(Commonwealth and State)

RTA, EPA

Local Govt - CMCs, Community Gps
Ongoing Who: EPA

What: No of educational programs and media hits

When: Annual report


HIGH PRIORITY: 4.3 Increase / promote integrated transport systems
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage public support for using public transport

- Develop more efficient, effective and user friendly/desired and targeted public transport system and facilities

State Govt and agencies

State Govt/RTA/EPA

Local Govt

All stakeholders

Ongoing Who: State Govt

What: No of people using public transport

When: Annual SoER


HIGH PRIORITY: 4.4 Increase / promote knowledge and information of air issues
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Community education programs

- Develop an integrated community education strategy and materials aimed at raising awareness of air quality issues and solutions

- Develop specialised integrated education strategies and materials aimed an Non-English speaking background (NESB) communities to raise awareness of air quality issues and solutions

All stakeholders CMCs, Govt agencies paretic EPA and RTA, Schools, Universities, Local Govt Govt agencies

Motoring organisations (NRMA)

Ongoing Who: Conservation agencies, Education Dept

What: No of programs and media hits

When: annual report


HIGH PRIORITY: 4.5 Improve waste Disposal and reduce generation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Waste Table
   
   

HIGH PRIORITY: 4.6 Ensure that property and environmental risk is appropriately evaluated
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Determine management responses - protection measures, retreat measures, accommodation measures
State Agencies, (inc. NSW Fisheries, EPA, etc), Local Govt Oyster farmers, other in-stream aquaculture uses, land owners, researchers
Implement urgently as above

HIGH PRIORITY: 4.7 Ensure appropriate baseline environmental conditions are assessed
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Determine monitoring requirements
State Agencies, (inc. NSW Fisheries, EPA, etc.) Local Govt. Oyster Farmers, Individual land owners

researchers

Implement urgently Who: DLWC, Local Govt community

What: Conditions after extreme weather events

When: Every 5 years and after events


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 4.8 Improve / promote sustainable land use planning and practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Urban Development table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 4.9 Improve / promote sustainable energy production
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Urban Development table
   
   

Action Table 5

5) Changes and Loss in Ecosystem and Species Diversity, Loss of Fishery Habitats

Principle Strategy::
To achieve sustainable ecosystems rich in species diversity and free from external extinction pressures.
HIGH PRIORITY: 5.1 Increase knowledge of threatening processes
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Undertake studies / survey's to identify threatening processes

- Support the implementation of recovery plans

- Identify key threatening processes from recreational / industrial and commercial sectors

- Avoid clearing of high value remnants

NPWS, DLWC, Greening Australia, Landcare

NSW Fisheries

Research Institutions

Vegetation or CMCs

Ongoing Who: Various

What: Studies Undertaken

When: SoER


HIGH PRIORITY: 5.2 Increase community awareness, understanding and involvement
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Raise awareness of the value of ecosystem diversity through activities which connect people to the natural environment.
As Above (see 5.1) As Above (see 5.1)
Ongoing Who: Various

What: Education Initiatives

When: SoER


HIGH PRIORITY: 5.3 Increase / promote native ecosystem representation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Identify important habitat links and support restoration programs

- Provide signage stating legislative status

- Coordinate education initiatives regarding the impact of clearing

As Above (see 5.1) As Above (see 5.1)
Ongoing Who: Various

What: Native ecosystem restoration and protection

When: SOER


HIGH PRIORITY: 5.4 Reduce / prevent competition from domestic and feral animals
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Implement trapping and control programs for pest and feral species

- Raise awareness of domestic and feral species impact

- Fund incentive programs - registration, desexing, curfews etc

As Above (see 5.1) and Local Govt As Above (see 5.1)
Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Reduction in feral and domestic animal perdition

When: SOER


HIGH PRIORITY: 5.5 Reduce / prevent impact of pollutants
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Stormwater management - refer Water Quality

- Educate about the effects of dumping weeds and rubbish

As Above (see 5.1) and Local Govt, DLWC Land holders and land managers
Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Number of Education programs run and SMPs implemented

When: SoER


HIGH PRIORITY: 5.6 Reduce / prevent habitat loss
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Identify significant remnants

-Support enhancement projects

- Support recovery projects 

Local Govt and relevant agencies Land managers

Community

Ongoing Who: Community Groups, Environmental organisations

What: Increased recognition of habitats, successful on-ground restoration and rehabilitation projects.

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 5.7 Reduce / prevent competition from weeds
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Provide education concerning the effects of weed dumping 

- Control weed proliferation on vacant or unused sites

Local Govt, land managers CMCs
Ongoing Who: all

What: Reduction in land degradation from weed infestation

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 5.8 Protect / maintain / improve vegetation links and corridors
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Declining Quality and Quantity of Urban Bushland, Remnant and Other Vegetation table
NPWS, DLWC, NSW Fisheries  
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 5.9 Achieve / promote Integrated resource management
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Support projects which take a holistic approach

Please see Integrated Natural Resource Management table

   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 5.10 Reduce / prevent poor land use
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Land Degradation table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 5.11 Improve / promote recovery and reintroduction programs and implementation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Train community groups 

- Raise awareness and develop management programs on local scale

Local Govt, DLWC, environmental organisations

NPWS

 
Ongoing Who: Environmental organisations, SoE indicators

What: surveys of attitudes, participation in on-ground projects

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 5.12 Reduce / prevent loss of genetic integrity
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Support correct seed collection protocols and revegetation practices.

- Document seed sources

Greening Australia, Seed Savers Network, nurseries Land Managers
ongoing Who: Major landholders and environmental organisations or CMCs

What: Improved biodiversity in given area

When: ongoing


LOW PRIORITY: 5.13 Reduce / prevent negative change in environmental conditions (greenhouse gases)
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote public transportation networks

Please refer to Air Quality table

   
   

LOW PRIORITY: 5.14 Reduce / prevent chemical residues in food chain
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Support minimalist use of herbicides and pesticides

- Support integrated pest management 

- Support monitoring programs

- Support stronger legislation and enforcement

CMCs, Local Govt, DLWC

Dept of Health

Land/Farm Managers
ongoing Who: EPA and research institutions

What: water quality and residual chemicals measured in biota

When: ongoing


Action Table 6

6) Loss of Cultural and Natural Heritage

Principle Strategy:
Support programs that protect and conserve cultural and natural heritage within the Southern Sydney Region.

HIGH PRIORITY: 6.1 Increase / promote community awareness, understanding and involvement
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Identify Aboriginal, European and natural heritage sites not yet recognised

- Encourage school study groups and ongoing research into special, temporal, economic, spiritual and social significance's issues

- Consider significant remnant vegetation community preservation orders

- Develop integrated education strategies and materials aimed promoting and explaining the relevance and the protection of Aboriginal, European and other cultural and natural heritage sites and issues in achieving a sustainable society

Aboriginal groups, Individual landowners

Dept Aboriginal Affairs

Ethnic Affairs

NESB Groups

State and Federal Govt agencies

CMCs

Community

ongoing Who:

Elders,

Representatives of National Estate,

Land Councils

What:

No of properties of sites listed, protected

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 6.2 Improve management of cultural heritage items and sites
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Enhance and complete registers of heritage values

- Promote Best Management Practice (BMP)

- Develop criteria and procedures to enable identification and assessment of significant Aboriginal heritage sites.

NSW Aboriginal Land Council,

elders,

Dept of Aboriginal Affairs,

Land owners,

agencies,

Local Govt
ongoing Who: Councils, Heritage Registers

What: Registers complete and updated

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 6.3 Improve / promote awareness of heritage areas
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop sensitive and appropriate heritage trails and corridors
As 6.1, 6.2 plus Local Govt, NPWS Heritage Office, DLWC
Ongoing Who: NPWS, Local Govt

What: Trails developed, community workshops

When: Ongoing


Action Table 7

7) Land Degradation

Principle Strategy:
To prevent further degradation, and restore existing land within the Southern Sydney Region.
HIGH PRIORITY: 7.1 Improve / promote runoff control
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Support stormwater management plans

- Develop and support a project officer to work with / train Councils to enforce sediment and erosion controls on building sites

- Install monitoring sites

DLWC,

EPA,

Local Govt

NSW Fisheries
Ongoing or duration of project Who: Local Govt officers, CMC Coordinators

What: Best Practice audited and implemented

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 7.2 Reduce / prevent Nutrient enrichment
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Foster nutrient control and monitoring programs
DLWC, EPA, Local Govt NSW Fisheries
Ongoing or duration of project Who: EPA. Local Govt

What: Unsewered areas assessed, treatment plants upgraded, areas revegetated

When: SoE Report


HIGH PRIORITY: 7.3 Protect / improve / enhance Wetlands
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Identification and mapping of wetlands and processes threatening them
DLWC, EPA, Local Govt

NSW Fisheries

NPWS

Community
Ongoing or duration of project Who: DLWC, EPA, research institutions

What: Areas mapped

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 7.4 Reduce / prevent Sedimentation
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Research effectiveness of control techniques
DLWC, EPA, Local Govt  
Ongoing or duration of project Who: Local Govt

What: Best practice implemented

When: During construction (ongoing assessment)


HIGH PRIORITY: 7.5 Increase / promote community awareness
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Foster appreciation programs (water courses and wetlands) to change community behaviour
DLWC, EPA, Local Govt

NSW Fisheries

NPWS

 
Ongoing or duration of project Who: EPA, DLWC, CMCs

What: Education programs run and amount of informative media air play

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.6 Reduce / prevent Vegetation cover loss / decline/ damage/ encroachment
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote bush regeneration, including the identification of species and their distribution

- Prepare regional vegetation management plans 

- Adopt fencing incentives

- Protect and manage remnants in reserves

DLWC, EPA, Local Govt

NPWS

Land managers and Community
Ongoing or duration of project Who: All agencies

What: Identified sites with management plans implemented

When:


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.7 Improve Land management
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Undertake land capability studies to underlie development controls

- Identify areas of poor land management and communicate examples of BMP

   
Ongoing or duration of project Who: Agencies

What: Level of adoption of suitable management/ increase in areas protected or managed

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.8 Reduce / prevent Soil erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage holistic planning of foreshore areas 

- Refer to Coastal Strategy for actions 

- Undertake planned, staged bush regeneration

- Ensure planned soil and vegetation work on any construction site

- Train contractors and field staff in soil conservation work

Coastcare Groups Land Mangers
Ongoing or duration of project Who: Land Managers, Local Govt and agencies

What: Coordinated management, erosion reduced and prevented, extent of groundcover per property, survey areas

When: ongoing - 2-5 years intense work


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.9 Reduce / prevent Weeds
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Weed identification training for Council officers 

- Mapping and benchmarking of regional density and distribution of weeds (terrestrial and aquatic)

- Enforce DA controls on vacant sites

   
Ongoing  Who: Agency and LAG Officers 

What: Mapping completed, training completed, vacant areas managed, eg. utility sites.

When: 2 years then ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.10 Reduce / prevent inappropriate land use
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Urban Development and Urban practices table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.11 Improve / apply Planning control and control over foreshore erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Coastal Dunes, Foreshore and Beach Structure Issues table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.12 Improve / apply management of domestic and feral animals
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Look into alternative methods of control for feral and domestic animals

- Education of pet owners 

- Management of species such as ibis and gulls

State Agencies,

Local Govt

Animal protection and community groups
Ongoing Who: Agencies, eg. NPWS

What: Reduction in pest numbers, increased awareness

When: Annual report


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.13 Improve / apply fire management practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Improved sediment controls for fire trails

- Improve maintenance of fire trails

- Community education regarding the role of fire in Australian ecosystems

CSIRO.

Local Govt,

Agencies

Bushfire Council

Land Managers
Ongoing Who: NSW Fire authorities

What: Improved fire prevention, control and management

When: Ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 7.14 Reduce / prevent contamination
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Extend the register of contaminated sites to include 'orphan' sites

- Illegal dumping strategy - incident response strategy 

- Train volunteers to assist with low risk clean ups

EPA Chemical companies,

land managers

Ongoing Who: Agencies

What: Rehabilitation of contaminated sites

When: Ongoing


LOW PRIORITY: 7.15 Improve flood control measures
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
See Flood Management
   
   

LOW PRIORITY: 7.16 Reduce negative recreational use impacts
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote environmentally friendly recreational activities
NPWS,

Govt agencies responsible for open space

Individuals using parks, etc
Ongoing Who: NPWS (e.g.)

What: Audits show sites not being degraded

When: Annual audits


7.17 PRIORITY: Reduce / prevent changing soil structure. eg. compaction
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote appropriate stocking rates and practices on farms
Land Managers  
Ongoing Who: Agencies

What: Decreased erosion, improved vegetation cover

When: ongoing


LOW PRIORITY: 7.18 Reduce / prevent bushrock removal (severe habitat loss)
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Education regarding the impact of bush rock removal - include nurseries.
DLWC,

NPWS

Land Managers
Ongoing Who: NPWS

What: Bushrock coverage

When: Regular reports


LOW PRIORITY: 7.19 Reduce / prevent / fix urban salinity
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote awareness of benefits of water use and retention/establishment of perennial vegetation. 

- Provide technical support to assist with Best Practice implementation of plans

- Identify landscapes prone to the development of problems

- Prepare property and catchment, land and water management plans, including groundwater management

- Install and monitor piezometers in critical areas

DLWC. CMCs
Ongoing Who: DLWC, CMCs

What: Areas identified and mapped, management plans prepared and implemented

When: 3 years, then ongoing


Action Table 8

8) Waste and Litter

Principle Strategy:
To reduce waste to landfill and encourage reuse and recycling amongst all facets of the community.

HIGH PRIORITY: 8.1 Significantly change waste disposal attitudes, & practices and achieve a massive reduction in waste generation and land fill
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage all to reduce, re-use and recycle.

- Develop new and innovative ways to recycle and utilise waste

- Initiate and/or develop new types of biodegradable packaging and encourage and make greater use of currently available biodegradable packaging

- Demonstrate the positive long and short term good economics of sustainable packaging, waste generations and disposal

.
Local Govt, schools, State Govt agencies conservation organisations CMCs, community groups, packaging manufacturers scientists

Local Govt, schools, State Govt agencies conservation plastic bag and other packaging manufacturers

Researchers, universities, economists

Producers of consumer goods

Plastic bag and other packaging manufacturers

Producers of consumer goods conservation organisations, CMCs, community groups, community individuals

conservation organisations, CMCs, community groups

Ongoing Who: Local and Govt. State agencies, conservation organisations, community groups

What: Education programs, reduction in waste, increase in recyclable or recycled goods

Documents changes is land fill tonnage and content and recycled material

New ways to recycle, reuse new forms of biodegradable packaging

When: annual SoE Reports SoER


HIGH PRIORITY: 8.2 Significantly change community attitudes and behaviour concerning waste disposal, littering, and related practices
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop integrated community education strategies and materials aimed at raising awareness of waste and litter issues and increasing personal responsibility for waste generation and disposal

- Develop specialised integrated education strategies and materials aimed at Non-English Speaking Background (NESB) communities aimed at raising awareness of waste and litter issues and increasing personal responsibility for waste generation and disposal

- Investigate, develop and instigate, and new innovative anti-litter campaigns and strategies

- Widen current anti-litter programs (eg. butts of the beaches, don't be a butt head programs for cigarette butts, and underwater clean up of the Harbour by divers) to apply to other areas and regions (Southern Sydney)

- Widen current anti-dog waste programs (eg "doggy do" litter bins and biodegradable "doggy do" bags)

- Investigate, develop and instigate new innovative anti-dog litter/waste programs campaigns and strategies

- Ensure compliance and enforcement of current legislation

Local Govt, schools, State Govt agencies conservation organisations, CMCs

Local Govt, schools, State Govt agencies conservation organisations CMCs, community groups

Local Govt, State Govt agencies

plastic bag and other packaging manufacturers

cigarette manufactures

pet food other pet products manufacturers, and producers

CMCs, community groups community individuals

Ongoing Who: Local Govt, State Govt agencies

What: Education programs reduction in waste, increase in recyclable ore recycled goods

When: annual SoE Reports SoER research reports


HIGH PRIORITY: 8.3 Significantly reduce littering, inc. reduce litter in waterways and marine areas
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop stronger and more relevant legislation to reduce waste and litter and change waste disposal practices

- Deposits on all drink and similar containers

Local Govt, State Govt agencies Local Govt, schools, conservation organisations

CMCs, community groups and individuals plastic bag and other packaging manufacturers Producers of consumer goods Cigarette manufactures

Ongoing Who: Local and Govt, State agencies

What: New legislation, regulations

When: Annual SoE Report SoER annal reports special reports when required


HIGH PRIORITY: 8.3 Significantly reduce littering, inc. reduce litter in waterways and marine areas (ctd.)
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Installation of many more effective litter trapping devices at suitable locations

- Maintenance of current litter trapping devices in place

- Development and installation of more effective, efficient and economical litter trapping devices

Local Govt 

State Govt agencies

Local Govt, State Govt agencies Universities

Conservation organisations CMCs

community groups and individuals

conservation organisations community groups and individuals

Ongoing Who: Local and Govt, State agencies

What: New legislation, regulations

When: Annual SoE Reports SoER annual reports

special reports when required


HIGH PRIORITY: 8.3 Significantly reduce littering, inc. reduce litter in waterways and marine areas (ctd.)
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Support current programs such as Clean Up Australia, and Storm Water Management Plans
Local Govt, State Govt agencies schools, conservation organisations CMCs

community groups and individuals plastic bag and other packaging manufacturers

Producers of consumer goods

cigarette manufacturers

 
Ongoing Who: Local and, Govt, State agencies

Media: Clean Up Australia

What: Greater no of people involved effective SMPs in place

When: Annual SoE Reports SoER annual reports

special reports

medial reports


Action Table 9

9) Urban Development and Urban Practices

Principle Strategy:
To ensure urban development proceeds in a manner which recognises environmental values of the region and appropriate policies are developed and implemented to ensure these values are protected in perpetuity.
HIGH PRIORITY: 9.1 Change inappropriate performance measures
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- With community support, assess Strategic Plans, LEPs and Development Control Plans to ensure that Best Practice Environmental Management can be implemented within the zoning framework.
Local Govt,

DUAP,

NSW Fisheries

Developers, community
ongoing Who: DUAP

What: No of plans reviewed against an environmental benchmark

When: annual


HIGH PRIORITY: 9.2 Reduce / prevent development of sensitive areas, eg. Foreshores, dunes.
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Oppose alienation and development of any foreshore lands to prevent further impacts such as erosion, loss of vegetation, impact on recreational amenity, water quality, etc.
Local Govt,

Defence,

NPWS

DLWC,

CMCs,

Fisheries,

SCCG

ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Areas protected in via zoning 

When: annual


HIGH PRIORITY: 9.3 Reduce / prevent non-sustainable water use
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer Water Quality etc table
   
   

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 9.4 Promote / ensure adequate monitoring and assessment of environmental health
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Ensure sufficient staff are employed by Local Govt and Dept of Health to monitor high risk (eg. unsewered) areas

- Employ more and better resource Environment Officers to ensure more effective monitoring of enviro health to enable actions to be instigated if problems are identified

Local Govt Dept Health, Conservation agencies

NSW Fisheries

ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Programs undertaken and audited

When: annual reports


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 9.5 Promote / ensure / establish a sound developer, community and stakeholder knowledge and information base for land use planning decisions
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Ensure sufficient information is collated to make informed planning decisions

- Develop an integrated education strategy and materials aimed at raising awareness of the need for, and identifying and implementing better land use and urban practices throughout the region

- Develop specialised integrated education strategy and materials aimed at Non-English Speaking Background (NESB) communities to raise awareness of the need for, and identifying and implementing better land use and urban practices throughout the region

Local Govt, Local Govt, DUAP

NSW Fisheries

Conservation agencies
ongoing Who: DUAP, Research institutions

What: Assessment of validity and currency of data, identification of data gaps

When: ongoing 


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 9.6 Reduce / prevent non-sustainable energy use
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop relevant effective education programs, etc. and identify and implement legislation changes needed to ensure consumers are aware of an encouraged to use sustainable energy sources and encourage reduction I the use of non-sustainable energy sources

- Develop economic programs to encourage reduction in the use of non-sustainable energy sources and greater use of sustainable energy sources

- Identify and implement legislation changes needed to ensure consumers are aware of any encouraged to use sustainable energy sources

State Govt agencies

SEDA

State Govt agencies

SEDA, Energy producers

State Govt agencies, Local Govt

Consumers
ongoing Who: Dept of Mineral and Energy, SEDA

What: Percentage of energy used from sustainable sources

When: annual


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 9.7 Improve / change insufficient impact assessment processes and rigour
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Ensure mechanisms which trigger impact assessments cover all potentially damaging projects

- Ensure indicators used by (consultants) are appropriate

State Govt agencies Local Govt
ongoing Who: DUAP

What: No of EISs triggered, scope of developments

When: Annual report


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 9.8 Improve / change unsophisticated consultation practices and non-transparency in decision making.
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Ensure consultation with stakeholders and community is broad-reaching and well-planned

- Outcomes of decisions to be made public

Local Govt, Govt agencies EDOs, other agencies, Aboriginal Land Council
ongoing Who: Representatives of stakeholder groups, eg. Aboriginal Land Council

What: Surveys of projects for which consultation has taken place

When: After decision-making process completed

Action Table 10

10) Depletion of Natural Resources

Principle Strategy:
To implement appropriate policies, practices and procedures for land use planning, and extraction of natural resources.
HIGH PRIORITY: 10.1 Improve / promote education in natural resource asset values and need for conservation to achieve attitude and behavioural changes such as reduce resource use and waste, and reduce consumerism
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Development of community based education programs that incorporate effective, locally based people and projects

- Provide training in and access to prior studies that have been successful in achieving behavioural change 

- Include cross cultural component in programs

Educational institutions,

Govt agencies, 

Environmental organisations
ongoing Who: Govt agencies

What: Surveys of attitudes, no of programs held

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 10.2 Reduce / prevent Incomplete/ ineffective land use planning
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop appropriate policies and Strategic Plans which acknowledge natural resource assets of area

- Ensure policies and Development Control Plans are implemented

Local Govt

State Govt

Developers

Consultants

ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: No of projects which demonstrate BPM

When: with SoER - annual


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 10.3 Improve waste generation and disposal
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage recycling programs

- Facilitate and support projects that incorporate Waste Board Strategy 

Waste Board

Local Govt, EPA

Community Gps,

CMCs,

Individuals 

ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Decrease in tonnes of waste to landfill

When: Annual assessments


LOW PRIORITY: 10.4 Improve mining practices , poor management and planning
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop and implement Extractive Industry Rehabilitation and Environmental Management Plans and undertake regular monitoring

- Review activities of active industries

- Rehabilitate sites and identify sites (eg. instream) where active management is required

- Develop a sand and gravel management plans for Southern Sydney

DLWC,

EPA,

Dept Mineral Resources,

Local Govt 

Site Managers

Site Managers,

Community Gps,

Conservation Gps

ongoing Who:

DLWC,

EPA,

Local Govt

What:

Plans in place and implemented.

Inactive sites rehabilitated

When: Ongoing, but prioritise areas. 


Action Table 11

11) Coastal Dunes, Foreshore and Beach Structure Issues

Principle Strategy:
To ensure appropriate planning and development occurs in coastal and foreshore areas with respect for sensitivity of coastal ecosystems.
HIGH PRIORITY: 11.1 Increase / promote appropriate planning, use and management
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage beach and foreshore management plans to be prepare and adopted

- Refer to Coastal Strategy for Actions

Local Govt Coastal Management Committees
ongoing Who: Local Govt, DLWC

What: Protection and rehabilitation of priority areas

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 11.2 Reduce / prevent / fix degradation of intertidal areas
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Support declaration of marine parks (or other forms of protection) in Hacking River and Botany Bay

- Research into use and rehabilitation of existing sites and building new sites

- Map historical areas 

Dept of Fisheries

Local Govt,

DUAP

NSW Dept of Fisheries 

Local Govt,

DUAP

ongoing Who: NSW Govt

What: Area of conservation parks declared

When: ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 11.3 Reduce / prevent inappropriate recreational use
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Community education on vehicle use in coastal areas eg. Coast care

- Enforce regulations re: use of water craft in sensitive areas (mud flats, saltmarsh, seagrass, mangroves).

Local Govt, NPWS,

Waterways, DUAP + Fisheries

Individual recreational drivers/clubs recreational vehicle origin
ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Sensitive areas protected, signage erected, areas monitored

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 11.4 Reduce / prevent wind erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Encourage replanting of denuded dunes

- Ensure weed species (eg. bitou bush) are removed

Local Govt, NPWS Beach users
Ongoing Who: Environmental groups, Local Govt

What: Identified priority areas replanted and fenced

When: Project time frames then ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 11.5 Reduce / prevent storm erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Ensure that dune and foreshore vegetation is protected intact and replanted where it has been removed

- Ensure that foreshore vegetation is appropriately sited with reference to high tidal movements and other coastal set-up influences

Local Govt, NPWS Environmental Groups
Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: No. of areas protected

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 11.6 Reduce / prevent sand erosion
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Protect areas which have been damaged by recreational use, eg. by fencing, revegetation

- Close or reroute vehicle tracks

Local Govt, NPWS

private coastal land holders

Environmental groups, individuals
Ongoing Who: Local Govt, Coastcare

What: No of areas protected

When: ongoing


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 11.7 Reduce / prevent / loss of and improve foreshore access
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Improve public access and provide appropriate signage

- Discourage further sale of public foreshore lands 

Local Govt, DUAP DLWC, CMCs
Ongoing Who: Local Govt

What: Areas purchased 

When: Ongoing


Action Table 12

12) Depletion of Water Resources, Altered Flow Regimes, Loss of Good Quality Groundwater

12 a) Depletion of Water Resources

Principle Strategy:
To ensure adequate environmental flows to sustain healthy aquatic ecosystems, whilst providing adequate water for sustainable primary production purpose and human use.
HIGH PRIORITY: 12a.1 Achieve sustainable water use/ reduce / prevent overuse
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote water re-use and demand management initiatives

- Encourage cleaner production initiatives

DLWC

CMCs

Sydney Water
Ongoing Who: Agencies, Local Govt

What: Reduced per capita urban use

When: Ongoing


HIGH PRIORITY: 12a.2 Increase community awareness and understanding
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Promote and coordinate education campaigns aimed at appropriate use of available resources
State Government 

Sydney Water

Local Govt

Sydney Water

Ongoing Who: Environmental Organisations, DLWC

What: No of campaigns, reduced water use

When: Ongoing


12 b) Altered Flow Regimes

Principle Strategy:
To achieve wet and dry weather flows capable of supporting functional and sustainable ecosystems throughout the catchment.
MEDIUM PRIORITY: 12b.1 Improve flood plain management
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Develop and support and implement Flood Plain Management Plans (FMPs)

- Review operation, maintenance and ownership of floodplain management infrastructure

- Implement river flow objectives

Local Govt

DLWC

Sydney Water

Floodplain Management Committees

RTA

State Emergency Service

Ongoing Who: Local Govt, DLWC

What: No of FMPs developed and implemented

When: SoER


MEDIUM PRIORITY: 12b.2 Reduce / prevent changes in streamflow regime
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Implement environmental flow objectives set by the EPA and subsequent actions eg. modification or removal of existing structures EPA
DLWC

CMCs

Ongoing Who: CMCs, DLWC

What: Number of waterways where flow objectives have been set and adhered to 

When: SoER


12 c) Loss of Good Quality Groundwater

Principle Strategy:
To achieve sustainable, good quality groundwater resources.

MEDIUM PRIORITY: 12c.1 Reduce / prevent contamination from poor quality surface water and leachate
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Please refer to Water Quality table
   
   

LOW PRIORITY: 12c.2 Reduce / prevent depletion of aquifers
STRATEGY / ACTION RESPONSIBILITY
Primary Secondary
TIME FRAME MONITORING AND EVALUATION
- Prepare Water Allocation Management Plans (WAMPS) (ie. safe yields for sustainability and environmental management)

- Register bores and log extraction volumes and rates

DLWC NSW Farmers Federation
Ongoing Who: DLWC

What: WAMPs prepared

When: ongoing



4 NHT Applications

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The NHT has comprehensive guidelines regarding the information which must be supplied in order to seek funding. It is strongly recommended that you seek assistance in the first instance from your CMC coordinator.

Assistance from a suitably qualified technical support person may also be required to obtain sufficient information to validate your application. In particular, where scientific data related actions are planned, it is very important to consult with relevant researchers and universities for advice.

The following table (split into 3 parts - ed) should be used to assess whether your project complies with NHT funding guidelines. The more ticks you have in boxes, the more likely your project is to gain approval for assessment at the RAP level and beyond.

Table 4.1 Assessment Table for use by Project Applicants and Assessors
(based on the 1999/2000 NHT project funding guideline criteria)

 
Key Regional Issue / PrioritiesCriteria for NHT funding (refer to Page 3 of NHT 1999/2000 application form)
Long term sustainable improvement Good value for money Feasible and technically sound Appropriately funded by NHT (not LGAs or others) and not core business Project $ contribution to match -1:1 Have strong community support and involvement
Integrated NREM            
Poor water quality, loss of wetlands;            
Declining quantity and quality of urban bushland, remnant and other vegetation            
Poor air quality - greenhouse gases, climate change, sea level rise            
Change and loss in ecosystem and species diversity, loss of fishery habitats            
Loss of cultural and natural heritage            
Land degradation            
Waste and litter            
Urban development and urban practices            
Depletion of natural resources            
Coastal dunes, foreshore and Beach Structure issues            
Depletion of Water Resources, Altered flow regimes, Loss of good quality Groundwater            

 
Key Regional Issue / PrioritiesStrategic significance of project (refer p. 4 of the 1999/2000 NHT guidelines)
Addresses biodiversity and ESD objectives Addresses key high priority regional issues Strong community / stakeholder support and commitment Appropriate scale - ie. strategic significance Long term objectives and maintain protection / improvements
Integrated NREM          
Poor water quality, loss of wetlands;          
Declining quantity and quality of urban bushland, remnant and other vegetation          
Poor air quality - greenhouse gases, climate change, sea level rise          
Change and loss in ecosystem and species diversity, loss of fishery habitats          
Loss of cultural and natural heritage          
Land degradation          
Waste and litter          
Urban development and urban practices          
Depletion of natural resources          
Coastal dunes, foreshore and Beach Structure issues          
Depletion of Water Resources, Altered flow regimes, Loss of good quality Groundwater           

 
Key Regional Issue / PrioritiesAdditional significant issues to be addressed
Addresses Aboriginal issues and concerns Addresses Monitoring and Evaluation issues and requirements Formal or informal Partnerships or cooperative projects
Integrated NREM      
Poor water quality, loss of wetlands;      
Declining quantity and quality of urban bushland, remnant and other vegetation      
Poor air quality - greenhouse gases, climate change, sea level rise      
Change and loss in ecosystem and species diversity, loss of fishery habitats      
Loss of cultural and natural heritage      
Land degradation      
Waste and litter      
Urban development and urban practices      
Depletion of natural resources      
Coastal dunes, foreshore and Beach Structure issues      
Depletion of Water Resources, Altered flow regimes, Loss of good quality Groundwater       


5 References and Bibliography


Appendices

Appendix A

Catchment Management Structures

Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee

In 1998, the State Catchment Management Coordinating Committee (SCMCC) established regional organisations (now Regional (Catchment) Coordinating Committees or 'RCCs'), for preparing RSPs and facilitating the Natural Heritage Trust (NHT) funding process. Two RCCs were subsequently set up for the greater Sydney Metropolitan area, one each for the Southern Sydney and Sydney Harbour Region.

Membership of the Southern Sydney Regional (Catchment) Coordinating Committee includes community based members local government and State Agency representatives as outlined below and in the following table.

Urban Community Representatives / Catchment Management Committees

Community based members selected for urban CMCs require expertise in some aspect of catchment management or related areas, rather than 'primary production' (as described in the SCMCC guidelines) as used in rural areas. They should preferably, but not necessarily be current or past CMC members.

Sustainable natural resource management in urban Sydney must consider urban productivity (eg the tourism and recreation industries rather than primary production) - although some urban catchment do involve some forms of primary production.
 
Southern Sydney Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee Membership, 1998

(# Executive Committee members)

Name Organisation
Peter Wells # Chair - SSRCC and Chair - Hacking River CMC
Phil Morgans Chair - Cooks River Catchment Management Committee (CMC)
Rob Michie # Chair - Georges River CMC
Graeme Greenup # Chair - Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay CMC
Libby Rawlingson Coordinator - Hacking River CMC
Jill McNeill Coordinator - Georges River CMC
Nicole Wilmot Coordinator - Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay CMC
Jill Merrin A/ Coordinator - Cooks River (CMC)
Jane Tarran Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay CMC rep
Allen Madden Metro Local Aboriginal Land Council /
Betty Carroll Inner Metropolitan Regional Organisation of Council (IMROC)
Cr George Glinatsis # Sydney Coastal Council Group (SCCG)
Julie Brady Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Council (WSROC)
Melissa Gibbs Southern Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils (SSROC)
John Hickey Waterways (Policy Safety and Environment)
Steve Nichols Department of Land & Water Conservation (DLWC) & SHRCC
Jack Hannan NSW Fisheries & Port Jackson CMC
Andrew Bryant Department of Urban Affairs and Planning (Sydney Region East)
Noel Hadjimichael State Chamber of Commerce
Mark Forgerty State Chamber of Manufacturing
Bob Marr Environment Protection Authority (Catchments Section)
Gary Dunnett National Parks Wildlife Services
Colin Jones # Sydney Water
Sally Ash Greening Australia & Lower Parramatta River CMC
Faye Sutton # Nature Conservation Council & EBBBCMC
Christine Guthrie Bushcare

Southern Sydney Regional Assessment Panel (RAP) - 1998

The RAP is responsible for assessing the NHT Funding Applications against the RSPF and developing a Regional Funding Bid to the Commonwealth.

Membership of the RAP for Southern Sydney Regional Assessment Panel (SSRAP):

    Southern Sydney Regional Assessment Panel (SSRAP) membership, 1998
    NAME
ORGANISATION
Rob Michie, Chair, RAP
Philip Sanson (alternative member)
Chair, Georges River CMC
Simon Mitrovic Cooks River CMC
Bruce Pease Hacking River CMC
Dave Gathercole Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay CMC area rep
Juanita Higgs Local Government / SSROC
Garry Dunnett NPWS
Neil Rendell DLWC
Kieran Horkan / Chye Ang EPA - (provided technical advice)
Adam Smith NSW Fisheries
Andrew Roberts Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Lands Council
Sally Ash Environmental Interest Representative / Greening Australia
Dr Jane Tarran Academic Representative and Eastern Beaches / Botany Bay CMC area
Christine Guthrie Bushcare

NOTE: A maximum common membership of 40% between members of the RCC and RAP was recommended for 1998

SSRCC Strategic Planning Workshop

The following people contributed their valued collective wisdom, thoughts and visions to this document at the Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Planning Workshop held on 18 November 1998 at the Land Titles Office in Sydney.
 
Attendance List
Name Organisation
Helen Hillier Kinhill
Lucy Archer Kinhill
Helen Weston Workshop Facilitator.
Kim McClymont SSRCC Regional Strategist
Trevor Cameron SHRCC Regional Strategist
Jeanne Thuez SSRCC Project Support Officer
Peter Wells Chair - SSRCC & Chair - HRCMC
Rob Michie Chair - GRCMC
Graeme Greenup Chair - EBBBCMC
Libby Rawlingson Coordinator - HRCMC
Jill McNeill Coordinator - GRCMC
Nicole Wilmot Coordinator - EBBBCMC
Jill Merrin A/ Coordinator - CRCMC
Jane Tarron EBBBCMC
Brett Stevenson EBBBCMC Rep
Robert Burke IMROC
Melissa Gibbs SSROC
Bruce Taper Kogarah Council (Estuary Management Rep.)
John Hickey Waterways - Policy Safety and Environment
Jack Hannan NSW Fisheries & PJCMC
Karen Kennedy Landcare - DLWC
Bob Marr EPA - A/Principle Officer Catchments Section
Geoff Ross NPWS (Kurnell)
Tony Prior NPWS (Threatened Species)
Colin Jones Sydney Water
Sally Ash Greening Australia & CBICCMC
Faye Sutton Nature Conservation Council & EBBBCMC
Juanita Higgs SSRAP / Local Government / SSROC
Bruce Pease SSRAP / Hacking River CMC / NSWF /
Neil Rendell SSRAP / DLWC
Debbie Stevenson Bushcare (NPWS)
Sarrah McGirr Rivercare (Cth)
Kelly May Fisheries Action - NSW Fisheries
Susan Wyndham TCM Secretariat

Appendix B

RSP Related Legislation and Policy

Information sources include:

The State Catchment Management Coordinating Committee (SCMCC) policy has required that Regional (Catchment) Coordinating Committees (RCCs), such as the Southern Sydney Regional (Catchments) Coordinating Committee, be developed which should prepare the Regional Strategic Plan and facilitate the Natural Heritage Trust (NHT) funding process. Members of SCMCC and CMCs are ministerially appointed under the NSW Catchment Management Act (1989). The RCCs and CMCs create the links between the community and government to achieve integrated sustainable natural resource management.

The over-riding Departmental objective for the implementation of the RSP is to meet the objectives of the National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development and the NSW Catchment Management Act (1989).

Other international, national, state, regional and local policies, legislation and agreements may also affect the activities of any SCMCC, RCC, CMC/T, and the general business of NREM in any region.

These policies may include but are not limited to the policies and legislation summarised in Table B.1.
 
Table B.1: Principle RSP Related Policies and Legislation
International Agreements and Policies

  • International Migratory Birds Agreement including Japan Australia Migratory Birds Agreement (JAMBA) and China Australia Migratory Birds Agreement (CAMBA)
  • Wetlands listed under the RAMSAR Convention on Wetlands of International Importance
  • Convention on Climate Change
  • Migratory species listed under the Bonn Convention;
  • Rio Declaration and its accompanying Action Plan, Agenda 21
National Policies, Strategies and Legislation

  • National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development
  • Intergovernmental Agreement on the Environment (1992)
  • National Water Quality Management Strategy 1994, (ANZECC and ARMCANZ)
  • National Competition Policy
  • National Weeds Strategy
  • Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (include Vulnerable and Endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Protection Act 1992)
  • Endangered Ecological Communities listed under the Endangered Species Protection Act 1992
  • NSW Fisheries Management Act 1994, and amendments (includes aquatic habitat protection Regs).
  • Native Vegetation Management Conservation Act 1997
  • Wetlands listed in 'A Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia'
  • Species protected under the National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975
  • Species protected under the Whale Protection Act 1980
  • Policies and areas managed by Environment Australia ( inc. the Biodiversity Group);
  • National Strategy for the Conservation of Australia's Biological Diversity
State Policies, Programs and Legislation

  • State Environment Protection Policy - Wetlands (SEPP 14)
  • NSW Coastal Policy 1997
  • NSW Total Catchment Management Act 1989
  • Rivercare Program
  • NSW Fisheries Habitat Management Plans
Regional Strategies, Policies and Programs

  • EPA Water quality and river flow objectives for Southern Sydney and Parramatta River catchments
  • Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy
Local Strategies, Policies and Programs

  • Stormwater Management Plans
  • Catchment Management Plans
  • Local Environmental Plans
Individual

  • Voluntary Management Agreements
  • Voluntary Conservation Agreementss

B 1: ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING INSTRUMENTS

Land use in NSW is largely controlled by planning documents known as environmental planning instruments (EPIs). These set out the planning requirements of an area or a piece of land. The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act) established a three tier system of EPIs: local environmental plans (LEPs); regional enironmental plans (REPs); and State environmental planning policies (SEPPs).

An EPI may be designed to do a wide range of things, including:

In many cases, different EPIs will apply to the same piece of land. However, there has been significant case law concerning the interrelationship between them, and one does not override the other, unless explicitly stated. Generally, an EPI should include a statement about its relationship to any other relevant instruments, and different types of instruments can also amend each other.

Decisions about how land can be used are made by 'consent authorities' such as local councils or the Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning. Consent authorities are guided on how to apply EPIs in their decision-making by Development Control Plans (DCPs made under the EP&A Act), Local Approval Policies (LAPs) (under the Local Government Act 1993) and Protection of the Environment Policies (PEPs) (under the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997).

B 2: LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL PLANS (LEPS)

Development at the local level is controlled through LEPs which specify what developments are allowed or prohibited in a particular area (with or without consent), and whether the land has been reserved for another use. LEPs must be agreed to by the Minister for the Environment and can be amended at any time. LEPs can apply to the whole or part of a local council area and are referred to by the name of the area.

B 3: REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL PLANS (REPS)

REPs apply to any area of land which the Minister considers to have regional significance. In practice, REPs have been related to broad regional areas (eg Hunter Regional Environment Plan No. 1) and local areas having regional significance (eg Georges River Regional Environment Plan, currently being finalised). REPs have also been used for implementing State policies such as urban consolidation by changing allowable densities in LEPs across Sydney or regions in Sydney.

B 4: State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs)

SEPPs can deal with a wide range of topics. They are referred to by their number (eg SEPP No. 19 - Bushland in Urban Areas, and SEPP 14 - Wetlands). SEPPs often operate by changing the details of existing LEPs, for example, removing development restrictions or imposing consent requirements which do not exist under the LEP.

B 5: Which Planning Instruments Apply

To find out which planning instruments may apply to a particular piece of land, people can apply to the local Council for a certificate under Section 149 of the EP&A Act (know as a 'Section 149 certificate'). Further details, or information about larger areas can be obtained from the Council, which keeps a record of all relevant current EPIs as well as DCPs and LAPs. Councils also have a master map showing current zonings or other controls and a register of any consents given for specific development applications. All of these are open for public inspections at Council premises during business hours.

B 6 Finding copies of EPIs

REPs and SEPPs are published in the NSW Government Gazette and are included in the volumes of NSW Rules and Regulations. LEPs are also published in the NSW Government Gazette and since 1 July 1996 have been listed in NSW Rules and Regulations.

B 7: State Legislation and Policies

Table B 2: State Legislation and Policies
State Environmental Planning Policies Affecting the Sydney Region
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 8 Surplus Public Land
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 14 Coastal Wetlands
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 19 Bushland in Urban Areas
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 26 Littoral Rainforests
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 29 Western Sydney Recreation Area (Not circularised)
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 32 Urban Consolidation - Redevelopment of Urban Land
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 35 Maintenance Dredging of Tidal Waterways
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 44 Koala Habitat Protection
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 46 Native Vegetation Conservation Act 1997
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 48 Major Putrescible Land Fill sites
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 50 Canal Estates
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 55 Remediation of Land
Draft State Environmental Planning Policy Sewerage Works

 
State Government Regional Environmental Planning Instruments for the Sydney Region
Legislation Suburb
Regional Environmental Plan 26 City West
Draft Regional Environmental Plan Georges River Catchment
Draft Regional Environmental Plan Sydney region

 
State Environmental Planning Policies Affecting the Sydney Region
Policy Subject
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 35 Maintenance Dredging of Tidal Waterways
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 43 New Southern Railway
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 44 Koala Habitat Protection
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 46 Protection and Management of Native Vegetation
State Environmental Planning Policy No. 55 Remediation of Land

 

Appendix C

Please note that whilst this section provides both acronyms and glossary terms that may not be directly referred to in this interim RSP, they have been provided to assist applicants and may shed light on other material pertinent to this plan.

Acronyms and Glossary


Acronyms
BMP Best Management Practice
CAMBA China-Australia Migratory Bird Agreement
CMC Catchment Management Committee
COAG Council of Australian Governments
CRC Cooperative Research Centre
CSIRO Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research
CT Catchment Trust
DCP Development Control Plan
DLG Department of Local Government
DLWC Department of Land and Water Conservation
DUAP Department of Urban Affairs and Planning
EDO Environmental Defenders Office
EIA Environmental Impact Assessment
EIS Environmental Impact Statement
EM Environmental Management
EMC Estuary Management Committee
EP&A ACT Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979
EPA Environment Protection Authority
EPI Environmental Planning Instrument
ESD Ecologically Sustainable Development
GIS Geographical Information System
GMR Greater Metropolitan Region
GPT Gross Pollutant Trap
ICZM Integrated Coastal Zone Management
IGAE Intergovernmental Agreement on the Environment
ILAP Integrated local Area Planning
JAMBA Japan Australia Migratory Bird Agreement
KPI Key Performance Indicator
LAP Local Area Plan
LEP Local Environmental Plan
LGA Local Government Association
MOU Memorandum of Understanding
NCC Nature Conservation Council of NSW
NESB Non-English Speaking Background
NESD National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development
NHT Natural Heritage Trust
NP National Park
NPWS National Parks and Wildlife Service
NREM Natural Resource and Environment Management
NSW New South Wales
RAP Regional Assessment Panel
RCC Regional Coordinating Committee
REP Regional Environmental Plan
RFO River Flow Objectives
ROC Regional Organisation of Councils
RSC Regional Steering Committee
RSP Regional Strategic Plan
RTA Roads and Traffic Authority
SB Stormwater Board
SCCG Sydney Coastal Councils Group Inc.
SCMCC State Catchment Management Coordinating Committee
SEDA Sustainable Energy Development Authority
SEPP State Environmental Planning Policy
SSRAP Southern Sydney Regional Assessment Panel
SSRCC Southern Sydney Regional Coordinating Committee
SLSC Surf Life Saving Club
SoER State of the Environment Report
SRCMS Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy
SSROC Southern Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils
STP Sewage Treatment Plant
SWMCC State Water Monitoring Coordinating Committee
TCM Total Catchment Management
WQO Water Quality Objectives
Principle source: Sydney Regional Coastal Management Strategy.

Glossary



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<META NAME="DC.Description" CONTENT="The Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan (SSRSP) recognises that Australia's Coastal Cities are currently not sustainable, typically being under extreme environmental pressure as a result of many years of our society not respecting or changing to adapt to their natural thresholds and carrying capacity. It is therefore of significant societal concern that it is these urban coastal areas, such as the Southern Sydney Region, that support the vast majority of the Australian population and represent the major portion of the Nation's economic base">
<META NAME="DC.Relation" CONTENT="This Regional Strategic Plan has been developed from the Southern Sydney Regional Strategic Plan Framework document. It was prepared in February 1998 after a number of joint meetings of the Southern Sydney and Southern Sydney Regional Organisations (as they were known at that time). A list of 'causes' or 'threatening processes' affecting the Regions was compiled and expanded in consultation with a working party from both Regional Organisations. Threatening processes were classified as 'high', 'medium' or 'low'.">
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<META NAME="DC.Rights" CONTENT="The SSRSP is offered without copyright for all original material herein, provided that the source (the SSRCC) is acknowledged">
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